1. What is Advanced Search?


Advanced search enables increased accuracy of search results by using additional syntax to focus the search.  One or more search criteria or operators can be combined in order to tailor the results more specificalltowards your needs. These operators allow you to find what you're looking for quickly and accurately. For Search Engine Optimizer's (SEOs), advanced search operators are essential if you want tPeek undethe hood’ by doing a much deeper anmore accuratweb searches.



2. Advanced Search Operators

The following 4 search operators are widely known on most search engines and can be used to adjust search results to your current needs:

1.  [-keyword] excludes the keyword from the search results, e.g., [loans -student] shows results for altypes of loans except students' ones
2.  [+keyword] allows for a forced keyword inclusion (especially useful for including stop words), e.g., [seo +for]

3.  ["key phrase"] shows search results fothe exact phrasee.g.["seo company"]

4.  [keyword 1 OR keywor2] shows results for at least one of the keywords, e.g.[Google Oyahoo]

 A Complete SEO Tutorial 

3. Google Search Queries

The following table lists which search operators work best with each Google Search Service.



SearcService



Search Operators


Web Search


ImagSearch


Groups


Directory


News


Product Search




4. Google Advanced Search Operators

Google supports a number of advanced search operators used to help resolve SEO issues. The table below gives a brief overview of the queries, how they can be used for SEO purposes, and the examples ousage:





Operator
Short Description
SEO Application
Examples










(Site:) - Domain-

Restricted Search






Narrows a search to (a)

specific domain(s)

Shows approximately* how many URLs arindexed by Google




Includes subdomains


Shows sites of a specific TLD




(InURL:) / (AllInUrl:) - URL Keyword Restricted Search

Narrows the results to documents containing(a) search term(s) ithe URLs


Find web pages having your keyword in a file path.




(InTitle:) / (AllInTitle:) -Title Keyword Restricted Search

Restricts the results to documents containing (a) search term(s) in a page title


Find web pages usinyour keyword in a pagtitle




(InAnchor:) / (AllInAnchor:) - AnchoText Keyword Restricted Search

Restricts the results to documents containing (a) search term(s) ithe anchotext of backlinks pointinto a page


Find pages having most backlinks most powerful backlinks with   the keyword ithe anchotext




(Intext:) - Body Text Keyword Restricted Search

Restricts the results to documents containing (a) search term(s) ithe body text a page


Find pages containingmost relevan/most optimized body text




(Ext:) / (Filetype) -

Narrows search results

A few of possible










Filetype Restricted

Search

to the pages that enin a particular file extension

extensions/ filetypes:

·       pdf ( AdobePortablDocument Format)
·       htmor htm ( HypertexMarkup Language)
·       xls ( Microsoft

Excel)

·       ppt ( Microsoft

PowerPoint)

·       doc (Microsoft

Word)





(*) - Wildcard Search


Means "insert any word

here"


search for a phrase

"partial match"

[seo * directory] returns "seo free directory""seo friendly directory", etc





(Related:) - Similar

URLs Search

Shows "related pages" by finding pages linkinto the site and lookinwho elsethey tend tlink to (i.e.,"co- citation")



Evaluate how relevanthe site's "neighbors" are








(Info:) -Information about a URL Search






Gives information abouthe given page

Apart from providing links for further URLinformationthis search   can alert you of
possible site issue(duplicate content or possible DNS problems)


[info:seomoz.org] will show you the page title, description and invityou tview its related pages, incoming links, and page cacheversion



(Cache:)


Shows Google's saved copy of the page

Google's text version of the page works the same way as SEBrowser







 
* Display Bug: Not all indexed URLs might be displayed (even iyou use the "repeat the search with omitted results included" link to see the full list). To see more results, the following search patterns can be used:


·     [site:yourdomain.com/subdirectory1] + [site:yourdomain.com/subdirectory2] + etc (the "deeperyou dig, the more/more accurate results you get)
·     [site:yourdomain.com inurl:keyword1] + [site:yourdomain.com inurl:keyword2] + etc (for subdirectoryspecific keywords)
·     [site:yourdomain.com intitle:keyword1] + [site:yourdomain.com intitle:keyword2] + etc

5. Combined Google Queries

To get more information froGoogle advanced search, learn how to effectively combine search operators. The following table illustrates which search patterns can be applied to make the mosof some importanSEO research tasks:





What for
Description
Format
Example










Competitive
Analysis

Search who mentionyour competitor; use the date rangoperator within Googleadvanced search to find mosrecent branmentionsThe following brand- specific search terms can be used[domainname.com][domain name][domainname][site owner name], etc.



[domainname.com - site:domainname.com]

(+ add &as_qdr=d (past one dayto the query string)








Keyword
Research

Evaluatthe given keyword competition (sites that apply proper SEO to targethe term).


[inanchor:keyword intitle:keyword]



Find more keyword phrases

[key * phrase]






SEO Site
Auditing

Learn if the site has canonical problems

[site:domain.com inurl:www]




Find the site's most powerful pages

[ www site:domain.com]


[ tld site:domain.tld]









[inurl:domain site:domain.com]




[domain site:domain.com]







Find the site's most relevant page

[site:domain.comkeyword]




[site:domain.comintitle:keyword]




Find the site's most powerful pagrelatedto the keyword

[site:domaiinanchor:keyword]













Link Building





Find authority sites offering a backlink opportunity

[site.:org bookmarks/
links/ "favorite sites"/]


[site.:gov bookmarks/
links/ "favorite sites"/]


[site.:edu bookmarks/
links/ "favorite sites"/]









Search for relevanforums and discussion boards to participate in discussions and   probably link bactyour site


[inurl:forum OR
inurl:forums keyword]









 
6. Advanced Query Operators for Microsoft Bing



Operator



Description



altloc:

Used to specify a local search thais outside major markets

AN(all upper case)

Finds web pages that contain althe terms or phrases in a query. Samas & and

&&

contains:

Keeps results focused on sites that have links to the file types that you specify

define

Triggers an Instant Answer definition fothe specified word

domain:

Limits results to the specified domain

feed:

Finds RSS or Atom feeds pertaining to the teryou specify

filetype:

Returns only web pages of the specified file type

hasfeed:

Finds web pages that contain both the term oterms for which you are querying and one omore
RSS or Atom feeds

imagesize:

Constrains the size of returned images. Valid size parameters are "small","medium" and "large"

inanchor:

Returns web pages that contaithe specified term in the anchotext

inbody:

Returns web pages that contaithe specified term in the metadata or ithe HTML

body

instreamset:

Checks to see if a string is present with one omore properties

intitle:

Returns web pages that contaithe specified term in the metadata title of the site

ip:

Finds sites thaare hosted by a specific IP address. The IP address must be a dotted quad address

keyword

Takes a simple list as a parameter. Althe elements in the list are ORed togetherSee example in section below.

language:

Returns web pages written in a specific language.

literalmeta:

Any string within parentheses is interpreted literally; thais, with no word-breaking or symbolic interpretation.

loc:

Returns web pages from specific country or region

meta:

Allows the filtering of content based on special tags in HTML

msite:

Source filtering used to refine a query for a multimedia site

near:

Constrains the distance betweeterms so thadocuments that contain instances of


the specified termwithiten or fewer words of each other are returnebefore

those that don’t. For closer associations use "near:nwhere n is an integer.

noalter:

Keeps the query from being altered by the Alteration Service

norelax:

Makes sure queries return only terms that are in the query

NO(all upper case)

Excludes web pages that contain the specified term oterms. Same as - .

O(all upper case)

Finds web pages that contain eithethe terthat precedes the operator or the termthat follows the operatorSame as | and ||.

site:

Returns web pages that belong to the specified site.

url:

Returns results thaindicate whethethe specified domaior URL is in the Bing

Index

"your search query"

Returns results that contaithe specified phrase, exactly



7. Comparisoof Advanced Search Operators across Major Search Enignes

Google
Yahoo
Bing/MSN Live
Search Term
Meaning
site:
site:
site:
domain/ directory path
Restricts search to a given domain/ directory
link:


(partialreport)
link:

URL
Searches for pages linking to a
given page

linkdomain

domain
Searches for pages linking to a given domai(including deep
links)


linkfromdomain
domain
Shows pages the domain links outo
inurl: / allinurl:
inurl:

kwd
Searches for given keyword in
the file paths
intitle: / allintitle:
intitle:
intitle:
kwd
Searches for a




given keyword in
the page title
inanchor: /
allinanchor:

inanchor:
kwd
Searches for pages that use thegiven keyword as the anchotext
intext:

inbody:
kwd
Searches for a given keyword in
the page body text
ext: / filetype:
originurlextension:
filetype:
file type
Restricts search to a given URL
extension
related:


domain/ URL
Searches for related sites and pages (based on
co-citation)
*
*


Inserts one or more words
info:


URL
Gives additional information about
the URL
cache:


URL
Showthe saved
copy of the page

region:
location: / loc:
specific location identity code
Narrows search results to the sites belonging to a
particular territory

url:
url:
URL
Shows if the pagwas indexed by the SE


contains:
file type
Narrows search results to pages linking to a
specified file type


ip:
IP address
Shows sites sharing one IP
address


feed:
kwd
Narrows search results to terms contained in RSS or Atom feeds

8. A-of Advanced Operators Explained



The following is an alphabetical list of the search operators.  Each entry typically includes the syntax, the capabilities, and an example.

allinanchor:                        If you staryouquery with allinanchor:Google restricts results to pages containing alquery terms you specify in the anchotext on links to the page. For example, [ allinanchor: best museums sydney ] will return only pages iwhich the anchotext on links to the pages contaithe words “best,” “museums, and “sydney.Anchor text is the text on a page that is linked to another web page or a different place on the current page. When you click on anchor text, you will be taken to the   page o place  on the page to which it is linked. When using allinanchor: in youquery, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allinanchor: is also availablthrougthe Advanced Web Search page, undeOccurrences.
allintext:                             If you start your query with allintext:, Google restricts results to those containing althe query terms you specify in the text of the page. For example, [ allintext: travel packing list ] will return only pages in which the words “travel, packing,” and list” appear in the tex o the page. This functionality can also be obtained through theAdvanced Web Search page, undeOccurrences.
allintitle:                             If you start your query with allintitle:, Google restricts results to those containing althe query terms you specify ithe title. For example, [ allintitle: detect plagiarism ] wilreturn onl documents that contain the words detect and plagiarism in the title. This functionalit ca also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, undeOccurrences.
The title of a webpage is usually displayed at the top of the browser window and ithe first line of Googles search results for a page. The author of a website specifies the title of a page with the HTML TITLE element. Theres only one title in a webpage. When using allintitle: in your query, do not include any other search operators. Thfunctionality of   allintitle: is also available through the Advanced Web Search page, undeOccurrencesIn Image Search, the operator allintitle: will return images in files whose names contain the terms that you specify.   IGoogle News, the operator allintitle: will return articles whose titles includthe terms you specify.
allinurl:                                If you start your query with allinurl:, Googlrestricts results tthose containing all the query terms you specify in the URL. For example, [ allinurl: google faq ] will return onl documents that contain the words google” and faq ithe URL, such as www.google.com/help/faq.html. This functionality can also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, undeOccurrences.
In URLs, words are often run together. They need not be run together when youre using allinurl: In Google News, the operator allinurl: will return articles whose titles includthe terms you specify.
The Uniform Resource Locator, more commonly known as URL, is the address that specifies the location of a file on the Internet. When using allinurl: in your query, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allinurl: is also availablthrough the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.
author:                                 If you include author: iyouqueryGooglwilrestrict your GooglGroups results tinclud newsgroup articles by the author you specify. The author can be a full or partial name or email address. For example, [ children author:john author:doe ] or [ children   author:doe@someaddress.com   retur articles  tha contai the  word children” written  by John Doe or doe@someaddress.com. Google will search for exactly what you specify. If your query contains [ author:John Doe ] (with quotes)Googlwon’find articles wherthe author is specified as Doe, John.
cache:                                   The query cache:url will display Googles cached version of a web page, instead othe  curren versio of  the  page Foexample  cache:www.eff.org   wil shoGoogles cached versioof the Electronic Frontier Foundation home page.
Note: Do not put a space between cache: and the UR(web address).   On the cached version of a page, Google will highlight terms in your query that appear               after      the         cache:   search   operator.             For example, [ cache:www.pandemonia.com/flying/ fly diary ] will show Googles cached version of Flight Diary in which Hamish Reids documents whats involved in learning how to flwitthe terms fly and diary highlighted.
define:                  If you start your query with define:, Google shows definitions from pages on the web for the term that follows. This advanced search operator is useful for finding definitions of words, phrases, and acronyms. For example, [define: blog] will show definitions for Blog (weB LOG).
ext:                        This is an undocumented alias fofiletype:.
filetype:              If you include filetype:suffix in your query, Google will restrict the results to pages whose names end in suffix. For example, [ web page evaluation checklist filetype:pdf ] will returAdobe Acrobat  pdf files that match the terms web, page, evaluation, and checklist.” You can restrict the results to pages whose names end with pdf and doc by using the OR operator, e.g. [email security filetype:pdf OR filetype:doc ]. When you dont specify a File Format in the Advanced Search Form or the filetype: operator, Google searches a variety ofile formats; see the table in File Type Conversion.
group:                   If you include group: in your query, Google will restrict your Google Groups results to newsgroup      articles from          certain      groups                       or subareas.          For              example,                 [egroup:misc.kids.moderated ] wilreturn articles in the group misc.kids.moderated that contaithe word sleep” and [ sleep group:misc.kids ] will return articles in the subarea misc.kids that contain the word “sleep.”
id:                           This is an undocumented alias for info:.
inanchor:             If you include inanchor: in your query, Google will restrict the results to pages containing thquery terms you specify in the anchor text or links to the page. For example, [ restaurantinanchor:gourmet ] will return pages in which the anchor text on links to the pages contaithe word gourmet and the page   contains the word restaurants.
info:                      The query info:URL will present some information about the corresponding web page. Foinstance,   Info:gothotel.com   wil sho informatio abou the  nationa hotel  directorGotHotel.com home page.
Note: There must be no space between the info: and the web page URL. This functionality can also be obtained by typing the web page URL directlyinto a Google search box.
insubject:        If you include insubject: in your query, Google will restrict articles in Google Groups to those that contain the terms you specify in the subject. For example, [ insubject:” falling asleep ]  will return Google Group articles that contain the phrase falling asleep” in the subjectEquivalent to intitle:.
intext:                  The query intext:term restricts results to documents containing term in the text. For instance, [   Hamish   Reid   intext:pandemoni ]   will   retur document tha mention  the  word pandemonia” in the text, and mention the names Hamish and Reid” anywhere in the document (text or not) Note: There must be no space between the intext: and the following word.
Putting intext: in front of every word iyour query is equivalent to putting allintext: at the fronof you query, e.g., [ intext:handsome intext:poets ] is the same as [ allintext: handsome poets ].
intitle:                  The query intitle:term restricts results to documents containing term in the title. For instance, [ flu shot intitle:help ] will return documents that mention the word help” in their titles, anmention the words “flu anshot anywhere in   the document (title or not) Note: Thermust be no space betweethe intitle: and the followinword.
Putting intitle: ifront of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allintitle: at the fronof youquery, e.g., [ intitle:google intitle:search is the same as [ allintitlegoogle search ].
inurl:                     If you include inurl: in your query, Google will restrict the results to documents containintha word  in the URL. For instance, [ inurl:print site:www.googleguide.com ] searches for pages on Google Guide in which the URL contains the word print. It finds pdf files that ari the  directory  o folde named  print”  on  the  Googl Guide  website.  The  quer [inurl:healthy eating will return documents thamention the words “healthy intheir URL, anmention the word eating” anywhere in the document.
Note: There must be no space betweethe inurl: anthe following word.
Putting inurl: in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allinurl: at the fronof your query, e.g., [ inurl:healthy inurl:eating ] is the same as [ allinurl: healthy eating ].
IURLs, words are often rutogetherThey need not be run togethewheyou’re using inurl:.
link:                       The query link:URL shows pages that point to that URL. For example, to find pages thapoint to GooglGuide’s home page, enter [ link:www.googleguide.com ]
Note: According to Googles documentation, you cannot combine a link: search with regular keyword search.” Also note that when you combine link: with another advanced operator Google may not return all the pages that match. The following queries shoulreturn lots of results, as you can see if you remove the -site: term in each of these queries. Find links to the  Google home page not on Googles own site. [ link:www.google.com - site:google.com ]
Find links to the UK Owners Direct home page not on its own site. [ link:www.www.ownersdirect.co.uk -site:ownersdirect.co.uk ]
Location:             If you include location: in your query on Google News, only articles from the location you specify will be returned. For example, [ queen location:canada ] will show articles that match the terqueen from sites in Canada. Many other country names worktry them and see.
Two-letter  U state  abbreviations  match  individual  U states,  an two-letter  Canadian province abbreviations (like Nfor Nova Scotia) also work  although some provinces dont have man newspapers online, so you may not get many results. Some other two-letter abbreviations  such as UK fothe United Kingdom  are also available.
Movie: If you includmovie: in your queryGooglwilfind movie-related information. or examples, see Googles Blogs
Related:               The query related:URL will list web pages that are similar to the web page you specify. Foinstance,  [ related:www.consumerreports.org ] will list web pages that are similar to the Consumer Reports home page.  Note: Don’t include a space between the related: and thweb page url.   You can also find similar pages from the Similar pages link on Googlemain results page, and from the  similar selector in the Page-Specific Search area of theAdvanced Search page.  I you expect  to  search  frequently fo similar  pages consideinstalling a GoogleScout browser buttonwhich scouts for similar pages.
site:                        If you include site: in your query, Google will restrict your search results to the site or domai you specify. For example, [ admissions site:www.lse.ac.uk ] will show admissioninformation from  London School of Economics’ site and [ peace site:gov ] will find pages about peace within the .gov domain. You can specify a domain with or without a period, e.g.either as .gov ogov. Note: Do not include a space betweethe site:” and the domain.
source:                 If you include source: in your queryGoogle News wilrestrict your search tarticles from the news source with the ID you specify. For example, [ election source:new_york_times ] wilreturarticles witthe word election” that appear in the New York Times.
Tfind a news source ID, enter query that includes a term anthe name of the publicatioyou’re seeking. You can also specify the publication name in the news source” field in the Advanced News Search form. You’ll find the news source ID in the query box, following the source: search operator. For example, let’s say you enter the publication name Haaretz ithe News Source box, then you click the Google Search button. The results page appears, and its search box contains [ peace source:ha_aretz    subscription_ ]. This means that the news source ID is ha_aretz    subscription_. This query will only return articles that includthe word “peace” from thIsraeli newspaper Haaretz.
Note: Some of the search operators wont work as intended if you put a space between the colon (:) anthe subsequent query word.


9. Twitter Search Operators


Standard Search Operators for Twitter.


Operator                                               r

t Description


containing both "twitter" an"search"This is the default operator.


containing the exact phrase "happy hour".


containing eithe"love" or "hate" (or both).


containing "beer" but not "root".


containing the hashta"haiku".


senfrom person "alexiskold".


sento person "techcrunch".


referencing person "mashable".







containing the exact phrase "happy hour" and sent nea"sanfrancisco".


sent within 15 miles of "NYC".


containing "superhero" and sent since date "2009-06-29(year-month- day).


containing "ftw" and sent up to date "2009-06-29".


containing "movie", but not "scary", and with a positive attitude.


containing "flight" and with a negative attitude.


containing "traffic" anasking a question.


containing "hilarious" and linking to URLs.


containing "news" and entered viTwitterFeed


Alternatively, you can use the advanced searcform to automatically construcyour query




10.    LinkedIn Search Operators


LinkedIn makes use othe Boolean Search Logi[Boolean search is explaifurther in this guide in section
11], however here is a quick guide to somothe main search operators that helyou get desired results in

LinkedIn search and a few practical tips on how to use them:


Operator

Short Description

Quoted Searches
Like in search engines, we have an option to find the exact phrase. For examplwe wiltake querywhich will provide the peoplwho is ithe position of SrManager (at a company),   query2 wilgivyou the project manager profiles alone.


NOT
If you want to exclude some search terms from your results, you can

use NOT operator. For instance, if you want to search project manager

profile excluding results from the United Kingdomyouquery should

be:


OR

If you would likto search for profiles which include one otwo or morterms, you can use Ooperator. For example, you want to know who
is Managing Director or CEO of a companythen you can separate those terms wittheupper-case word ORQuery: Managing Director OCEO

AND

If you would likto search for profiles which includtwterms, you need to use upper-case word ANto separate thterms

ParentheticalSearches

If you would likto do a complex search. For instance, find the Vice Presidents or Directors of Divisions, you can combine terms like this: VOR (director AND division)This wilfind peoplwho have VP itheir profiles, or have director AND division itheir profiles.

Title

If you woullikto find out the executive positions in an specifiindustrythen the title’ operator will helyou to do it. This operator will help employers to find suitable candidates, wilguide people in the expansion of the network with similar title people. For example, we will search for executives alonthen title:executive will show your desiredresultHowever you can use presentitlas ptitle: and currentitle as ctitlif you want to be more specific.

Company

If you would likto find out the specific company profiles theyou can use the operator called company:. Lets take an examplof peoplworking in Yahoothen you need to use company:yahoo inc. Furtheyou can divide it current company as ccompany and past company as pcompany

School

If you would likto search for your school guys on LinkedIn, you have an option called school operator.  Foinstance, if you want to search the profiles of your Anna University friends on LinkedIn, you need to


Country
Sometimes wrequire only people who from specific nationsThe

country operator gets this done. This operator will helyou to get some peoples email address treach thefor business purpose too. For example, you want to finthe CElist availablin US to send them mail, you can use the following querQuery: title:CEO country:United States

11.    Boolean Search Logic


BooleaSearching on the Internet

Boolean logic consists of three logical operators: NOT, AND & OR. Each operator can be visually described by using Venn diagrams, as shown below.


OR logic:          Most commonly used to search for synonymous terms or concepts.     The more terms or conceptwe combine in a search with OR logic, the more results we will retrieve. E.g. college OR university OCampus



AND logic:       Ithis search, wretrievrecords in which BOTH of the search terms are present. The more terms or concepts we combine in a search with ANlogic, the feweresults wwilretrieve. E.g. povertAND crime AND gnder


NOT logic:       In this search, we retrieve records in which ONLY ONE of the terms is present, the one we hav selected by our search. NOT logic excludes records from your search results. Be careful when you use NOT: the term you do want may be present in an important way in documents that also contaithe word you wish to avoid. E.g. Cats NOT dogs


This is  illustrated by the shaded  area  with  the  word  cats representing  all the records containing the word "cats" with no records are retrieved in the area overlapping the two circles wherthe word "dogs" appears, even if the word "cats" appears thertoo


OR logic:          You can combine both AND and OR logic in a single search. The use of parentheses in this search is known as forcing the order of processing. In this case, we surround the OR words with parentheses so that the search engine will process the two related terms as a unit. The search engine will use AND logic to combine this result with the second concept. Using thimethod, we are assured tha the semantically-related OR terms are kept together as logical unit. E.g. I want information about the behavior of cats. Search: behavior AND (cats

2 comments:

  1. Oh! it's a wonderful post where you've specifically described all the things for seo needs. keyword analysis to competitors analysis you've given priority I see and so want to add a tool for keyword and competitor analysis which is Colibri tool. I think this can be a great addition to your seo needs and available on colibritool.com.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I hope you will keep on submitting new articles or blog posts & thank you for sharing your great experience with us.

    ReplyDelete

Subscribe to RSS Feed Follow me on Twitter!